Law French

The body of now archaic legal terms used in the United Kingdom, descended from the Anglo-Norman dialect of Old French.

Many Law French terms survive in modern legal terminology. For example: bailiff, culprit, force majeure, jury, parole.

This corresponded to English law, as Blackstone enunciated it in 1765: By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband; under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs every thing; and is therefore called in our law-French a femme-covert . . . or under the protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord; and her condition during her marriage is called her coverture. For this reason, a man cannot grant anything to his wife, or enter into covenant with her: for the grant would be to suppose her separate existence.

Definition from wiktionary and Wikipedia

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