mandamus

A writ issued by a superior court ordering a public official or body or a lower court to perform a specified duty.

“Maybe I should get a bit of something writ up, just in case.” He frowned a bit. “My daddy always called them laying-down papers. Can’t remember what they’re really called.”

“If it’s just your goods that need looking after, it’s a disposition of property,” the innkeeper said matter-of-factly. “If it relates to other things it’s called a mandamus of declared will.”

Definition from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition (via Wordnik)

pomace

The pulpy material remaining after the juice has been pressed from fruit, such as apples.

Kote wiped his hands on his apron. “When you press apples for cider, you know the pulp that’s left over?”

“The pomace?”

“Pomace,” Kote said with profound relief. “That’s what it’s called. What do people do with it, after they get the juice out?”

“Grape pomace can make a weak wine,” Chronicler said. “Or oil, if you’ve got a lot. But apple pomace is pretty useless. You can use it as fertilizer or mulch, but it’s not much good as either. Folk feed it to their livestock mostly.”

 

Definition from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition (via Wordnik)